In the parable of five loaves and two fishes, Jesus feeds five thousand people. We only have four people in our house, but we managed to use five loaves from a Betty’s bread box and five cheeses from a Pong subscription box to make nine meals (or ten if you count two breakfasts).

1. Swiss Fitness Loaf (two breakfasts)

Swiss Fitness: a honey-sweetened loaf bursting with wholesome seeds. This nutritious, honey-sweetened wholemeal loaf harks back to our Swiss roots. Ideal toasted and served with butter for a simple and delicious breakfast slice.

We had this bread for breakfast with marmalade and raspberry jam. It was packed full of seeds. Dora did not like this bread—she nibbled around the edge and licked off the jam.

2. Yorkshire Pebble  + Sussex Slipcote lardon salad

Yorkshire Pebble: open-textured ciabatta-style loaf with extra virgin olive oil.

The bread had a mild flavour, was soft inside, and slightly crunchy on the outside. The flavour of the herbs in the Sussex Slipcote cheese was quite strong. It didn’t need a salad and probably would have been better on a cracker with a glass of cold white wine, sat outside in the sun.

3. Yorkshire Cobble + Northern Blue + French onion soup

Yorkshire Cobble: a close-textured loaf with a rich crust that reflects the cobbles of Yorkshire streets. Ply with a generous slice of Wensleydale and dream of the Dales.

The Northern Blue was undisputedly the star of this show. It was the creamiest blue cheese I’ve ever tried. We toasted it because I’m pregnant.

The Guardian’s recipe for the perfect French onion soup was quite successful. We had it for lunch as opposed to a starter, and there was enough for three adults and a child. Unlike Felicity Cloake, Dora was not a fan of onion soup. Even after I said it was beef soup, she refused to touch the onions. She loved the toasted Yorkshire cobble croutons, even when dipped into the soup.

5. Mahon steak sandwich

We tried the Mahon with a steak sandwich for the first meal. The steak and garlic mushrooms somewhat overwhelmed the cheese.

It was more successful sliced and eaten with the wholemeal loaf and pickle.

6. Wholemeal Loaf breakfast toast

Wholemeal Loaf: A flavoursome loaf made with Yorkshire-milled flour.

The wholemeal loaf was perfect toasted with marmalade or just butter. Of the bread, this was Dora’s favourite.

7. Wholemeal Loaf + Mahon cheese and pickle sandwich

Since the Mahon was pasteurised, I tried a little by itself without toasting it. The Mahon didn’t need anything with it. It would be a lovely hard cheese on a cheese plate. Still, you can't go wrong with a cheese and pickle sandwich.

8. Yorkshire Millers Loaf, Dol Wen, bacon and cranberry, with watercress Soup

Yorkshire Millers Loaf: soft and malty loaf made with Yorkshire-milled flour.

Bacon, brie, and cranberry are arguably one of the most inspired combinations for a sandwich; it didn't disappoint. The Dol Wen was lovely melted on the toast. It oozed over the bread and turned a lovely light brown. The bread went perfectly with melted cheese and soup. The watercress soup https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/wordofmouth/2013/jun/06/how-to-make-perfect-watercress-soup) was popular with most people. The watercress soup and the sandwich were good hot and cold. They would be something a bit different to take on a picnic; green soup with young children may be a little ambitious.

9. Brillat Savarin New York Cheesecake

Brillat Savarin is a triple cream cheese. When cooked, it is commonly used in cheesecakes. I tried a baked New York cheesecake. I used Brillat Savarin, sour cream, and full cream yoghurt. I marbled in rhubarb and we ate it with fresh rhubarb on the side. It was superb. However, the thought (and later reality) that it would result in serious acid reflux in the middle of the night, prevented me from eating (a lot) more.

Conclusion

The cheese and the bread were perhaps not entirely suited to each other. Some worked, some didn’t. However, I would recommend the cheese box as I’d never tried any of these cheeses. I hope the next boxes will be as good. Even though I’d wanted to help British cheesemakers, I did enjoy the French and Spanish cheeses. Putting Spanish cheese in a very British cheese and pickle sandwich and making the French cheese into a New York cheesecake with Yorkshire rhubarb, perhaps went some way to make up for it.

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